Stroke/Aphasia

Amazingly, the brain can reorganize itself by forming new neural connections through axonal ‘sprouting.” This means that undamaged axons grow new nerve endings to reconnect neurons whose links were injured or broken.

This malleability of the brain is especially promising to those who have suffered brain damage, such as through a stroke, radiation or other neurological impairments. Since only a few decennia ago there was generally little hope given with regards to overcoming the effects of such life – changing event.

Some of the first trials using this concept of brain malleability in clinical work was undertaken with stroke patients. Physical exercise was considered a number one priority but besides that that, therapists were also looking at other ways, to optimize neurogenesis (brain growth) by creating positive, new and uplifting experiences for their patients. All with the premise that that might contribute to healing and change.

Neurons firing

On a much smaller scale and without any medical credentials that is also what we like to achieve here at Joya. We’d like to give people some ‘time out’ from their daily patterns and offer them a chance to change focus. Because it is part of human nature to get caught in patterns that do not really serve us. And especially when we have been taken by surprise in such a seemingly cruel fashion it is important to look into the possibility of other options that still might be available.

Countering the effects of Aphasia

As a language disorder Aphasia can range from having to search for words and names, to being completely unable to speak, read, or write after a stroke, head injury or as a side effect of radiation therapy. At our centre we have only had experience with clients who had a mild form of aphasia. If a patient is not able to travel, there are options to hire some of our equipment. Feel free to discuss your options.